Trelawny Parish, Jamaica

Trelawny parish can be found in the northern section of Jamaica (Caribbean). It is located in the county of Middlesex, bordered by the parish of St Ann to the east, St James to the west, St Elizabeth and Manchester to the south, and the Caribbean Sea to the north.

Trelawny Parish is mainly flat, with wide plains such as Queen of Spain’s Valley, and Windsor. The highest point is Mount Ayr which is 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea level.

 

Land Area: 874.3 sq km (337.6 sq mi)

Capital Town: Falmouth

 

History

Established in 1770, this parish was named after William Trelawny former Governor of Jamaica.

Trelawny has pockets of rich culture indigenous to the parish. The southern section of Trelawny Parish is a part of the Cockpit Country, and is uninhabitable. It is therefore a natural reserve for flora and fauna; most of Jamaica’s 27 endemic bird species can be found there, along with yellow snakes, and the giant swallowtail butterfly, the largest butterfly in the western hemisphere.

Wakefield in North Trelawny is the home of the Tambu, Gerre and Mento Band. The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission (JCDC) has taught these traditions to children in several schools –Duncans All-Age and Granville All-Age. Drumming is also a part of the rich culture and was one of the teaching activities of JCDC.

With new attractions such as the Falmouth Cruise Ship Pier and the Multi-Purpose Complex, Trelawny is receiving well-deserved notice by tourism interests as it positions itself among the most attractive locations in the very competitive industry.

 

Main Towns:

  • Martha Brae
  • Stewart’s Town
  • Rio Bueno
  • Wait-a-Bit